Pragmatism & Hope

Pragmatism and hope

Some notes made from Wicks & Freeman (1998)

Pragmatism & philosophy

. . . the purpose of philosophy is not to find foundational knowledge; it is to generate hope

Hope

. . . hope is optimism about the possibilities for the future

. . . hope is a disposition to experiment with alternative ways of livig that hold some promise to realize our aspirations and those of others

Tasks

. . . experimenting with new ways of living

. . . finding more liberating vocabularies

Pragmatists

. . . does this idea work in this place and at this time?

Politics are important

. . . what can those of us here now agree to?

Example: Karl Weick and sensemaking

  1. We can (and do) interpret events in different ways.
  2. How do we come to an agreement about why things are the way they are and what we can do about them?
  3. How does our understanding emerge from what we did and with whom? And from what each of us did and with whom?
  4. When we are in an unfamiliar situation, we impose ourselves on it to make sense. [Pragmatists emphasize that without noting the context, we cannot make sense of things or of the way we make sense about things.]
  5. A limiting boundary condition to the amount of change we can make is what we can understand and what people around us can understand

 

Wicks, A. C., & Freeman, R. E. (1998). Organization Studies and the New Pragmatism: Positivism, Anti-positivism, and the Search for Ethics. Organization Science, 9(2), 123–140. https://doi.org/10.1287/orsc.9.2.123

 

WordPress to Drupal : First steps

I plan to use Drupal to re-organize this large blog: flowingmotion.jojordan.org.  This post lists the beginning steps.  Each step is quite large and if you are completely new to web development, you will need to look up and complete each step as a mini-project.

  1. Make a development environment on my laptop.  Set up WAMP.
  2. Set up Drush so that I download Drupal and its modules more easily.
  3. Set up a clean database in WAMP / PHPMyAdmin.
  4. Download the latest version of Drupal 7 and unpack it into folder in c:/wamp/www/myblog
  5. Go to my browser and install Drupal: “localhost/myblog”
  6. Use the command line to use Drush : “cd c:/wamp/www/myblog”
  7. Use Drush to download and enable the modules for “pretty url”
    1. drush dl token pathauto
    2. drush en -y token pathauto
  8. Chose a theme and use Drush to download/upload it.  I used Stanford’s Open Framework and downloaded it manually to /myblog/sites/all/themes.
  9. Logged in, set the time to UK and set up the date format.
  10. Under Appearance, set the Open Framework to the default
  11. Use Drush to install the modules needed for WordPress_Migrate (see above for the commands): migrate ctools features  media media_youtube migrate_extras
  12.  As of today’s date though this will change, do not download WordPress_migrate with drush. Go to its webpage and install the latest development version
  13. Go to Add Content and select Migrate. Look for the Worpress link
  14. Follow the instructions – all of the them!
  15. I  tried to retained my WordPress urls but that did not work and the aliases are borked too.  As it was not straightforward finding this workflow, I will leave this for now and worry about sorting my comment.

These are the basic steps for importing WordPress content into Drupal. It is not perfect but as this is a one off import, it is satisfactory.

Testing my theme

Links break when you move your site from WAMP to your hosting service?

The solution is to set up a parallel Virtual Host on WAMP so that http://mysite.localhost redirects to the default http://localhost/mysite (where mysite is the name of your site).

3 steps to set up a Virtual Host and solve those broken links when you move from WAMP to your hosting service

#1  Get oriented

  • You will only able to see your WAMP based site in your browser after you have turn on your WAMPSERVER by going to Start/All Programs.
  • Look where your files are stored by going into Windows Explorer or My Computer.
    • Look at your C://wamp/ folder
      • You will see c://wamp/www where you store all your websites (right?)
      • And c://wamp/bin/apache/conf/ folder where you see a file called httpd.conf

How to set up a new website – Step 3 – Set up your hosting and WordPress shell

Having got a domain name, I must tell my hoster to make space on their server for my domain name and that I will be using Google Apps for gmail.

I also load up a CUSTOM one click install of Wordpress prior to making the link up with Google Apps.

Situation:  I want to make the outline of my website at my hosters

  • I’ve registered and paid for my domain name
  • The registrar has alerted me by email that it is ready for use
  • I have pointed my domain’s name servers to my hosting service and set the name servers on the hosting side (this time I did nothing because the hosting service were also the registrar and they did everything.)
  • While I was waiting, I registered a Google Apps account for email.

Step 3 Fireworks by Jason O'Halloran via FlickrTask:  To register for Google Apps

Now I want to tell the hosting service to host my site.  I will also confirm that I will be using Google Apps for email.  And I will set up a WordPress shell which I will use as the scaffolding for my website.

Steps:

#1 Log in to the hosting service

  • Find it via Google!
  • Find the login link – never obvious
  • Recall the email address and password used for login and ‘access to the cpanel’.
  • Look for “Manage domains’
  • Select the new domain
  • Make sure that the check boxes for [both http//www.domainname.com and http://domainname.com] and Google mail are ticked.
  • Have a good look at everything else [without touching].
  • Choose full hosting [this may be different for other hosters].
  • Double check by going back to Manage Domains. Does it seem that the hosters know they are hosting the domain?

#2 Now load up the WP shell

The reason for loading up WP now is that when you are asked to load it up, you are reminded to have no files in the ‘domain space’.  So I want WordPress in place before the link up to Google.  Maybe, one day I will experiment with doing it the other way.

  1. Go to one click install and choose WordPress
    1. Chose CUSTOM install despite your sense that you want a SIMPLE install.
    2. Choose your domain
    3. Enter your username and email as requested.   The WordPress shell will contact you via your email and you can complete WordPress stuff later.
  2. You can try typing http://yourdomainname.com in a browser and seeing if it comes up.  If it doesn’t, that could be because the name hasn’t propgated around the internet yet (meaning your internet service provider cannot convert a bland request of get http://yourdomainname.com into action because there is insufficient common knowledge to pass you along from service to service to your website.)

Progress you have made to launching your site

  • You know have a domain name registered and pointing at a hosting service
  • You have told the hosting service to host this domain name (to make space on their servers)
  • You’ve told it to recognize your name with or without www
  • You’ve told it to will be using Google Apps for email
  • You’ve loaded up a (CUSTOM) install of WordPress and your hoster has done the few additional tasks such as make your database and install the WP software.  You can fix up your WordPress later.

Next – fetch code from Google

And upload it to your website so Google is authorized to run your email

How to set up a new website – Step 1 – Get a domain name

To get a domain name up and functional, I must
– choose a registrar
– buy the name
– point the name servers to my hosting service
– wait a little for the internet to learn the name is operational

Step 1 Fireworks by Jason O'Halloran via FlickrSituation:  I want to set up a new website

  • I’ve already mocked up what I want on a local (WAMP) server on my PC (not necessary to complete this step but I have done).
  • I’ve thought up a domain name which I am happy with.
  • I’ve already checked on Domainr, or a similar service, that my name has not been taken (is available.)

Task:  To buy a domain name

And have its nameservers pointing  at my hosting service, i.e. so customers who ask the internet for my domain name are set to the computer where my website will sit (be served).

Steps to get a new domain up-and-running

#1  Registrar

First, I must choose a registrar where I buy the domain name and renew it annually.  A registrar is a telephone directory or index for internet.  There are many and they cleverly cross-reference each other.   The best know is GoDaddy.com.

To make my choice

  1. Does the Registrar cover the address that I want?  A Registrar covers a  limited range of TLD or top level domains.  For example, a registrar in the US may not cover .co.uk addresses.
  2. How easy is it to point the Name Servers that will be listed with my domain name to the computers that will be hosting my website?  Have I got clear instructions from both ends – the registrar service and the hosting service (or Posterous or WordPress.com – the place where my website will physically sit)?
  3. If I have more than one registrar on my shortlist, is there any difference in their prices and reputation?
  4. Do I want to use my hosting service as my registrar or is it better to have ‘two suppliers’?
  1. My hosting service might give me a discount on the domain name (a few pounds or dollars) but now they have more power over me (they have my site and my domain name under their administrative control).
  2. I may have to buy my domain name elsewhere if they don’t offer my preferred TLD (top level domain – like .co.uk).
  3. If I buy (and renew) my domain name with a separate registrar to limit the power of your hosting service over me but then I must remember to  my domain name on time and to pointing the name servers listed at the registrar to the IP address of the hosters where my  website physically sits.
    1. I must enter the data of the registrar at your hoster and your hoster at the Registrar!
    2. Adminstratively, I must have two sets of commercial transactions that I must diarize 1-2 years ahead and coordinate.

#2 Buy your domain name

Now I have chosen my name and my registrar, I must buy my domain name.  I chose to buy a domain name through my hosters.  That means I don’t have an additional task of pointing the name servers to them.   If you choose to split the hosting and the registration, you will need other instructions.

  1. Get the right credit card (business or personal)
  2. Go to the online home of the Registrar (and probably set up an account.  I used my hosting service and I already had an account.)
  3. Find the right page and click whatever button to buy a domain name.
  4. The registrar tests whether the name is available. (If they don’t, clear out fast!).
  5. When they have confirmed the name is available (a few seconds), they ask for credit card details and an email address.
  6. They also suggest that I list my address at their office rather than display my full address on the internet.  I don’t know the pros and cons but I chose to list their address because I am tired of spam.
  7. When money has changed hands, they promise me an email and tell me to patient.  It takes a day or two for the network of domain name servers to gossip among themselves that my domain name isnow taken and that anyone who asks for it should visit my hosters.
  8. Finally, a job is not finished ‘until the money is in the bank.’  Print two copies of their email and put one in the expenses file for the accountant and one in the file holding all the details about this website.

#3 Test the domain name

Type in the new domain name to the browser bar (not Google – the browser bar) and see if it comes up.

This one worked quickly but don’t panic for up to three days.

PS The name does not show up in Google and should not show up in Google. Their search spiders don’t know the site is there and we don’t want to be found yet.  There is nothing to see.

Talk of peace will avail you naught

I’ve just discovered Urdu poet, Parveen Shakir, and her poem delightfully reminding us that it is pointless to talk of love and hate ~ that is it is pointless to talk about our position in the world. We are our willingness to engage with others . . . my prose is awful . . . read her poetry!

JamieMelissa wedding rehearsal, Jun 26, 2009 - 49 by Ed Yourdon via flickrParveen Shakir

Be overflowing with peace and joy,

and scatter them wherever you are

and wherever you go.

Be a blazing fire of truth,

be a beauteous blossom of love

and be a soothing balm of peace.

With your spiritual light,

dispel the darkness of ignorance;

dissolve the clouds of discord and war

and spread goodwill, peace, and harmony among the people.

This is your mission, to serve the people .  .  .  .

Actions not words

Let us write of each other rather than about each other.  Let’s be social. Let our thinking be collaboration?

Links and copyright

I would like to add proper links here including links to book sales or the representatives of Parveen Shakir‘s estate.  Anyone?

Hat-tip

Razarumi

Courage and mindfulness

Paolo Coelho challenged us today. “Creativity is a courageous act. Avoid opinions.” He summed up what I have been feeling for some time. Too much chatter and not enough creativity? How about you?

Fragilite by alibaba0 via FlickrToday, Paolo Coelho, as ever said something both wise and challenging.

“Creativity is a courageous act.  Avoid opinions.”

It was certainly challenging to me.  I use this blog as a filing cabinet to keep my notes as I think out the connections between the things I am reading, thinking and doing.

It is a rag bag, yet it has worked out well. A few loyal readers make it sociable too.

But I’ve begun to tire of having opinions partly because I live and work in worlds where opinions are ten a penny (and that is saying something as it is very difficult to buy any thing in UK for less than very many pennies).  Like a toddler grabbing at an animal, we voice our opinions for the pleasure of feeling powerful and with reckless disregard of any damage we might do to anyone else or ourselves.

Courage comes from anticipating consequences.  Courage comes from understanding that to do right we might also wrong, at least in some parts of our lives and the lives of others.  Courage comes from seeing through whatever we start and working through what we start to its natural end.  And sometimes courage leads us not to start at all, not out of cowardice, but because it is clear our act is just a worthless opinion and as self-indulgent as  a a small child handling an animal roughly.

It’s perhaps a feature of ‘mindfulness’ to be aware of the impact we have on the world and to act connectedly, and sometimes not to act because we realize our act is disconnected and minimally noise and potentially destructive.

Mindfulness and courage.  Do they go together?

Step 7: Consolidating my online strategy – Redirecting my WordPress.com blog to self-hosting

When you set up a self-hosted blog, you have two exactly same blogs on the net. People will visit your old deserted blog and you want them automatically redirected to your new blog at your new host. This is how.

The time has come to redirect my WordPress.com blog

Pink eyes detour by Senor Codo via FlickrFinally, the time has come to redirect my two year old blog with its 740 posts from http://flowingmotion.wordpress.com to http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org.

To remind you of where I am

  • The original blog is on http://flowingmotion.wordpress.com
  • An exact replica (with some theme updates) is on http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org

When I imported a copy of the original (see earlier steps), I made sure that I adjusted the permalinks first so the post urls are exactly the same, except for the name of the domain (wordpress.com and jojordan.org).

Why do I want to redirect my WordPress.com blog?

The problem I need to solve now is this.  If someone linked to me on their blog post,, say 18 months ago, a reader would follow their link to the original blog but the last post there would be as of a few days ago.  The blog would look deserted and because it has no updates, it will slowly lose page-rank, or google-favour.

I can’t ask everyone who has ever linked to me to update their links.  That’s not feasible.  So how can I bring those visitors to my new blog and keep my standing with Google too?

How does the redirect from my WordPress.com blog work?

What I can do is to set up a permanent redirect – a 301 for geeks – from http://flowingmotion. wordpress.com to http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org.  Then when someone follows an old link, they will be taken through the magic paths of the internet to the WordPress computers, and their computer will redirect the reader to Dreamhost, who will serve up the version of the post on their computers.

The reader will barely notice the redirect.  They have what they want and they are on an active alive blog where they can interact with humans and leave comments (which link back to their work).

I, of course, can update my posts when necessary, provided I leave the  title intact.

How do I redirect my WordPress.com blog to a self-hosted version?

To accomplish this feat, I go through three steps.

Redirect my new blog temporarily to WordPress.com

On my new blog at Dreamhost, I log in to Dreamhost (not my blog), go t0 Manage Domains, and choose the line for my blog which happens to be a sub-domain in this case (http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org).

Now I am going to pick Full Hosting and remove it.  Scary, huh?  I am not going to delete it in the far right column.  I am going to remove the hosting in the middle column.  This will keep the copy on the Dreamhost intact and I will recover it shortly.

Now I am going to chose the DNS for the same record and go to the next window.  In the middle, there is provision for a Customized domain.  In there I see an A – that is for IP addresses.  I don’t need that.  But in the dropdown menu is CNAME  – I choose that.

Then under Value I insert the url for my old blog, which in my case was  http://flowingmotion.wordpress.com.  [Note well there is a fullstop (period) there.  Make sure you put it in.]

Update

Redirect my old blog to Dreamhost

Now I head off to the  WordPress computers and login as usual to my old blog http://flowingmotion.wordpress.com.  Under Dashboard, at the bottom of the left hand column, I choose domains, and add the domain name for my new blog which is http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org.

Worpress checks that is has access and that by definition I own the new blog.  That’s why I had to open it up temporarily.

When it sees everything is OK, it tells me to whip out my credit card and page $9.97 and reminds me that I must pay them every year to keep the redirect going.  So put this date in my diary!

(At some point, I set my new blog as the primary blog.  It is self-evident when you see it.)

Reclaim my new blog

Now I head back to the Dreamhost computers, log in to the “panel”  (not to my blog), choose My Domains, find the line with my blog (in my case a sub-domain http://flowingmotion.wordpress).  I chose DNS and go and delete the value for the CNAME, which you recall was http://flowingmotion.wordpress.com.  Update.

I go back to My Domains and chose my blog again and this time stay on that page, go to the middle column and select full hosting.  A new window comes up.  I check the settings and choose full hosting.

Done!

Now when I put http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org  in my browser, I should bring up my blog.  When I put my old http://flowingmotion.wordpress.com in the browser, it should send me at the speed of internet over to Dreamhost and show my blog in the browser.

Blunder

Of course, it didn’t go quite this easy for me.  My redirect got in perpetual loop and the advice from Dreamhost, unfortunately, was “Wait. These things take time.”   Fortunately, young Nick Cochiarella from Olney nudged me 12 hours later to tell me Dreamhost were wrong and I got back in touch with them to check my settings.

This is what happened.  Two steps back, before the One Click Install, when I set up the subdomain I had chosen the wrong combination of make http://wwww go to http://.  There are three choices and I left it on the default.

When I One Click Installed, my wordpress on Dreamhost was set up as http://www.flowingmotion.wordpress.com.  When I redirected from WordPress.com, it was to http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org because that was the only choice we have.

Once I had corrected the address of my new blog by logging onto the blog (not Dreamhost panel) and taking out the www in the address registered under Dashboard/Settings/General, everything worked fine.

I also went back to the Dreamhost panel, Manage Domains, the line with my blog and DNS, and fixed up the redirects there to send any traffic looking for http://www.flowingmotion.jojordan.org to http://flowingmotion.jojordan.org.

I’m still a bit confused by it all.  The point is to remember you have an address registered within your new WordPress blog.  You may not think of it as you are staring at an unfamiliar Dreamhost panel