Skip to content →

Tag: corporate culture

Exuberant Monday: What atmosphere would you like today?

“There  is no place on earth more exuberant than Venice on a breezy, hot, cloudless, day.  The boats rock and swell in the Lagoon as if launching themselves, crewless, on adventure;  the ornate facades brighten in the sunlight;  the water smells fresh, for once.  The whole city puffs up like a sail, a boat dancing unmoored, ready to float off.  The waves at the edge of the Piazza di San Marco became raucous in the wake of the speedboats, producing a festive but vulgar music like the dash of cymbals.  In Amsterdam, Venice of North, this jubilant weather would have made the city sparkle with renewed purpose.  Here, it ended by showing the cracks in the perfection – .  .  .”  The Historian, Elizabeth Kostova.

I do love exuberance.  What atmosphere do you like best?

I was delighted last year to stumble over the work of Kay Jamieson who researches exuberance – mainly in scientists.

This piece in The Historian led me to reflect how inarticulate we are at describing the atmosphere that we prefer.  We probably fumble toward what we like and when we have the chance, attempt to re-create what we enjoyed in the past.  We probably recognize quite easily the surface features of what we enjoy.  But do we understand the deep structure that allows these surface features to emerge?

Kay Jamieson studies exuberance in individuals.  Saying it is OK to be exuberant is probably one of part of deep structure we need.  What are others?  To recreate an exuberant atmosphere – or the atmosphere we prefer.

And your preference is .   .  .:

Kay Jamieson on exuberance

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoXAK9qbRh4]

One Comment

Simple rules of communication in organizations

Simplicity is a world-beater

There is a wonderful cartoon about computer interfaces doing the rounds contrasting the simplicity of Apple and Google with the interfaces most of us construct.

Simple rules of communication

That reminded me of a place I worked at for many years, which had inherited three simple rules of communication.

FIRST. Write down what you want on ONE side of a piece of paper – no more. And the top third of the side will be used for routing instructions – you don’t get more paper for that.

SECOND. Send it to me in time for me to read it before we meet.

THIRD. When we meet, explain what you want fom me verbally or through your emissary.

What I will do

If I cannot understand what you want in one minute, with a further one minute for questions, I ask you very courteously whether “you would like to withdraw your paper”.

It is possible to keep things simple!

PS The accountants had another simple rule. On no account, ever, will we approve expenditure retrospectively. Decisions occur before actions.

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: